School days

Today is the first day of school for most of my Texas neighbors.  We also had a record high temperature of 107, but that’s beside the point.  Depressing, but not the point.

School is a really big part of so much of kidlit history.  Because, you know, these are books about kids and they spend most of their time in school.  Usually.  In no particular order, some of my favorite school incidents in kidlit history.

Illustration from Anne of Green Gables – Anne smashes slate on Gilbert's head.Anne thwacks Gilbert with a slate.   Well, he totally deserved it, what with calling her carrots and all.  Little did he know that she was not a girl to be trifled with.  Still love this line after all these years: “Anne had brought her slate down on Gilbert’s head and cracked it–slate, not head–clear across.”  And from there begins one of the greatest “I can’t stand you!” to “I will beat you at everything.” to “I guess we can be friends” to “I love you!” relationships ever.  What would their story have been like if Gilbert had never called her carrots?  Would there have even been a story? 

Side note: though I have nothing to back this up, I’m willing to bet that this one scene is the most commonly illustrated scene from Anne.  Such drama!

Side note #2: I have never been able to decide if this really hurt Gilbert’s head or if it was just super dramatic.  Perhaps it was more of a stunning situation. 

Side note #3:  Guessing all the boys were less likely to tease Anne after this one. 

Tacy runs away from school.  Everyone knows that Tacy is shy, and most people know how to handle that.  Except her teacher, Miss Dalton, who puts her right up front, away from the other kids (and more importantly away from Betsy), and next to her.  Who is, of course, a stranger.  So who can blame Tacy for running away during recess?  Tears and wailing on the part of both Tacy and Betsy ensues.  Thank goodness for Mrs. Chubbock who has chocolate men.  “They couldn’t very well eat and cry together.”  Words to live by, my friends!

Laura teaches school at the Brewster Settlement.  Laura is not yet 16 and is off to teach school.  Some of her pupils are older and taller and much meaner than she is.  The family she boards with is more than a little dysfunctional.  The scene with the knife still makes me shiver.  But as a historian, I’m grateful for this incident to show that not everyone did well in the wilderness.  The bright spot in what could be quite a lot of gloom—Almanzo–driving through the snow so she can go home each weekend.  Sigh.

Funny how two of my favorite school stories are also romantic. . .

What are some of your favorite school stories from children’s literature?

One thought on “School days

  1. I seem to love the scenes where a kid is having lots of trouble at school, and finally breaks down and confesses it to a family member, who helps or at least shows some solidarity.

    Jean Little’s Spring Begins in March, for example, where Meggie pours her heart out to her older sister and her sister’s friend. They set up a schedule and a system and even help her train her puppy, whose misbehavior had been the last straw for Meggie.

    And Judith Kerr’s When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit, the scene when the family is living as refugees in France, and Anna is having a terrible time trying to keep up in school when she knows so little French. Her Mama takes her to a cafe and gets her a pastry, which is an unprecedented treat, and listens to her problems.

    I don’t know why I like that little trope so much, but I do!

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