Birthday wish lists, then and now

Texas summers are an ideal time to go through those boxes and random places you throw stuff to get it out of the way. After all, it’s far too hot to do any outside chores. Last weekend, I went through a stack of things my mother had given me years ago in an effort to clean out her own hidden piles. In it was a birthday present wish list from when I was 10. Here’s the first page.

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Notice the inclusion of Anne of Ingleside? Guess I hadn’t made it through the whole series quite yet. The timing of the rediscovery was perfect–it was the day after I had received a truly remarkable Anne birthday present. How has Anne Shirley been a part of my life and my wish lists for over 30 years?

I’ve written about Anne more than any other character on this blog. I don’t remember exactly how old I was when I first read Anne–probably 8 or 9, a few years after the Anne of Green Gables mini-series. I do remember how I was introduced to her–completely by accident! Remember those delightful Scholastic order forms you would get in elementary school? I really wanted A Little Princess because I had seen the Shirley Temple movie and wanted to read the book. There was a 2 for 1 special, and Anne of Green Gables was automatically included. I’m sure I didn’t read Anne right away–after all, I had never heard of her. But when I did, I quickly became obsessed. And clearly, it’s an obsession that has staying power.

Over the decades, I’ve built a fairly impressive Anne collection. My preference is for serendipitous discoveries in antique stores, though I have bought a few things off of eBay. I have many, many versions of the books, including a first edition, 4th printing of Anne. I have dolls and tea cups and post cards and illustrations of Green Gables. Of course, I have things for some of my other book loves, especially Little Women  and Little House on the Prairie. But I definitely have more Anne things than anything else.

Part of my collecting bug is my fascination with how Anne has been adapted and remade over the decades, from bizarre book covers to the many, many film adaptations. Often, this feels like watching a train wreck, but I can’t turn away. Over the years, I’ve picked up a few things from the 1934 version, including the amazing study guide pictured below. And there’s that extra element of interest since the actress fell so in love with the character that she changed her name. Talk about obsession.

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But I had never been able to find anything relating to the 1919 silent film version. This is one of the countless silent films that didn’t survive. For it’s added bit of fun, the people involved ended up in a bit of a scandal. There were rumors of an affair between the actress, Mary Miles Minter, and the director, William Desmond Taylor, and then he was murdered in 1922. The case is still unsolved. And there are certainly theories that Minter was somehow involved in his death.

Years ago, I had a bid on a poster from the movie and lost it at the last moment. It is one of my great eBay regrets. At some point a few years ago, I mentioned this to my friend Jenn. I have no memory of telling her this story, but we travel together pretty regularly so we have certainly talked about all sorts of things.

For my 40th birthday, she gave me this.

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Isn’t it beautiful? She had mentioned my wish to a friend of hers that keeps an eye on this sort of thing–and he’s been looking for almost 2 years. I was absolutely amazed at the thoughtfulness–and dedication required–for this gift.

There isn’t anything else on my birthday wish list from 30 years ago that I would still want today. But Anne is still there–she’s almost always been there. Milestone birthdays are a time to reflect, and it’s comforting to realize that certain things in my life have remained so constant over the years. Now to find the right spot to hang my new treasure!

One thought on “Birthday wish lists, then and now

  1. Since I love both Anne of Green Gables and silent movies I was intrigued by the lost 1919 film. I did a bit of Wikipedia research, and followed up on some of the references shown for the silent movie’s article.

    Have you been to the Bala’s Museum website? Go to http://www.balasmuseum.com. There’s a red bar of titles (at least on my dinky little Kindle tablet) and if you click / tap on “silent movie” you’ll find information on the lost movie, including ways to spend money on souvenirs. The museum sells a color photocopy of Anne of Green Gables sheet music, plus they sell a DVD of a recreation of the 1919 movie. I have no idea of what the recreation consists of, but you may want to check out what the museum is doing to celebrate the centennial of the lost Anne movie.

    Thank you for the interesting post, and best wishes for your milestone birthday year.

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